Michelle Pfeiffer

Santa Ana, California, USA

Biography

Michelle Marie Pfeiffer (born April 29, 1958) is an American actress and producer. She has received many accolades, including a Golden Globe Award, and three nominations for Academy Award. Pfeiffer began to pursue an acting career in 1978 and had her first leading role in the musical film Grease 2 (1982). Frustrated with being typecast as the token pretty girl, she actively pursued more serious material and had her breakthrough role as gangster moll Elvira Hancock in the crime film Scarface (1983). Further success came with leading roles in the fantasy feature The Witches of Eastwick (1987) and the comedy Married to the Mob (1988). Her roles in Dangerous Liaisons (1988) and The Fabulous Baker Boys (1989) garnered her two consecutive Academy Award nominations, for Best Supporting Actress and Best Actress, respectively; her portrayal of lounge singer Susie Diamond in the latter is one of the most acclaimed of her career. Pfeiffer went on to star as Catwoman / Selina Kyle in Tim Burton's superhero film Batman Returns (1992), following which she won the Silver Bear for Best Actress and earned a third Academy Award nomination for playing a troubled housewife in Love Field (1992). She continued to gain praise for her performances in the dramas The Age of Innocence (1993) and White Oleander (2002), and the horror films Wolf (1994) and What Lies Beneath (2000). During this time, she also produced a series of films under her production company Via Rosa Productions. After a hiatus from acting in 2002, she returned with the musical Hairspray (2007). She received her first Emmy Award nomination for portraying Ruth Madoff in the HBO television film The Wizard of Lies (2017), she went on to feature in the ensemble films Murder on the Orient Express (2017) and debuted to the Marvel Cinematic Universe as Janet Van Dyne starting Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018). Description above from the Wikipedia article Michelle Pfeiffer, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.

Movies

The Early Show is an American morning television show which was broadcast by CBS from New York City from 1999 to 2012. The program aired live from 7 to 9 a.m. Eastern Time Monday through Friday in the Eastern time zone; most affiliates in the Central, Mountain, and Pacific time zones aired the show on tape-delay from 7 to 9 a.m. local time. The Saturday edition aired live from 7 to 9 a.m. Eastern Time as well, but a number of affiliates did not carry it or aired it later on tape-delay. It premiered on November 1, 1999, and was the newest of the major networks' morning shows, although CBS has made several attempts to program in the morning slot since 1954. The show aired as a division of CBS News. The Early Show, like many of its predecessors, traditionally ran last in the ratings to its rivals, NBC's Today and ABC's Good Morning America. Much like NBC's The Today Show and The Tonight Show, the title The Early Show was analogous to that of CBS's late-night talk show, The Late Show. On November 15, 2011, CBS announced that a new morning show would replace The Early Show on January 9, 2012. CBS News chairman Jeff Fager and CBS News president David Rhodes stated that the new show would "redefine the morning television landscape." On December 1, it was announced that the new show would be titled CBS This Morning. The Early Show ended its twelve-year run on January 6, 2012, to make way for the program. Charlie Rose, Gayle King, and Erica Hill were named anchors of the new program.

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The Early Show
1999