Triangle of Sadness

Canal+

Comedy
147 min     7.6     2022     Denmark

Overview

A celebrity model couple are invited on a luxury cruise for the uber-rich, helmed by an unhinged captain. What first appeared Instagrammable ends catastrophically, leaving the survivors stranded on a desert island and fighting for survival.

Reviews

CinemaSerf wrote:
I did quite enjoy this, but it's far too long and I found that the funniest bits had all already been seen in the trails! Initially, it centres around the fairly tempestuous relationship between models "Carl" (Harris Dickinson) and "Yaya" (Charlbi Dean). The latter is an influencer who looks at their relationship as something more transient; he is much more besotted - and so vows to make her fall in enduring love with him. Off onto a luxury yacht they head for an holiday with a few millionaires run by the super-officious "Paula" (Vicki Berlin) and captained by the dipsomaniac Woody Harrelson. The two befriend the lively and charismatic Russian oligarch "Dimitry" (Zlatlo Buric) and his wife "Vera" (Sunnyi Melles) before a captain's dinner that the choppy seas ensure ends in a messy and entertaining disaster! The remainder of their adventure has something of the "Admirable Crichton" to it, as they must adapt to the command of their erstwhile toilet cleaner "Abigail" (Dolly De Leon) who exacts her own unique sort of fees from her erstwhile patrons in return for catching fish and lighting fires... It does take a ping at the vacuousness of the modelling industry and at the unscrupulousness of big business - best exemplified in one scene with Oliver Ford Davies and Amanda Walker as the demure Brits who made their fortune selling "the greatest single contribution to democracy" (hand grenades!). Sadly, though, the moments of humour are relatively short and sweet when put into the context of this lengthy and frequently rather dull enterprise. Dickinson looks great shirtless, but as an actor he has limitations and I didn't really feel much chemistry between him and, well, anyone else. The last half hour could have been better, funnier, had there been a slight sense of menace - but somehow I just knew that the ending was going to deliver they way it does. Buric adds value, as does Henrik Dorsin's gazillionaire "Jarmo" but by half way through the joke had worn too thin to sustain it and I was a little bored. Doesn't need a big screen, and co-produced by the BBC I expect it can wait for Christmas television for most of us.

Similar